After glancing back at my findings, I came to several valuable conclusions:

  1. It is important to have talk about sex with your kids, but leave the rest (that you’re uncomfortable discussing, or don’t know much about) for the sex educators at school.
  2. Dan Savage is one of the many helpful sex educators that can be contacted in a time of need. Seek out people who can provide you with resources to make responsible sexual decisions.
  3. Get involved in Sex Week at your school. Help supply condoms, lube and other forms of contraception to students. Advocate for safe sex and encourage others to be responsible as well.
  4. Parents, fight for mandatory sex education in your child’s school. Know what type of sex ed your child will receive (abstinence-only or abstinence based) before piggybacking on concepts that he/she learns in school.
  5. Remember that everyone is unique. Some people identify as a gender that is inconsistent with the sex they were assigned at birth. While this poses conflict with sexual norms in society, it is up to the community to welcome him/her in with open arms, regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity (as seen on Glee).
  6. Be aware of the bills passing in your state. Do you want to live in a state like Tennessee where there is a limit on your exposure to homosexuality? Or do you want your kids to know that their friends are raised by gay parents?
  7.  Use your judgment to monitor or even restrict your child’s exposure to the media, especially the Internet and television/movies.
  8. Do not try to combat your sexual urges by playing soccer.

Dan Savage, gay rights activist – and sex educator? Indeed.

In the Washington City Paper, Dan Savage has his own column entitled “Savage Love” in which he responds to posts from the DC community. In this specific installment of Savage Love, Dan is contacted by a gay, high school boy with concerns regarding sex and sex education. In the article, the boy writes:

“[My boyfriend and I], we had sex education in our schools, but they didn’t cover gay sex” (Savage).

This aspect of neglect in the field of sex education angers me too, so I kept on reading.

I tried to talk to my mom about gay sex, and all she said was ‘please use condoms.’ We tried and we used condoms, but I think we must be doing something wrong because we can’t do it. We are ready to start having real gay sex – and we are frustrated and feel like failures as gay men. Any advice?” (Savage).

From this excerpt of the boy’s letter to Dan, I gather that there is not nearly enough emphasis on homosexual intercourse in schools and at home. While this is still a taboo conversation, it is a necessity to start including some resources for those who are involved in gay relations to be safe during intercourse. Especially at home, parents should be a helpful resource for their children, not a rut.

Dan Savage, a gay rights activist and sex educator in his own way, shines light on the subject to help this young boy and provide him the resources he needs. Dan shares that there are many ways as a gay couple that he and his boyfriend can get off together – mutual masturbation, oral sex, frottage, etc (Savage). Overall, Dan’s column must serve as a great tool to educate about sexuality in a simple manner: through the city paper.

In the future, I hope that this boy finds more easily accessible resources to get the answer to his question, as I’m sure there were millions of boys who wrote and didn’t get any response from Dan Savage in this column. The future of sex education will hopefully include gay relations and safe sex for all types of relationships. In addition, the means to obtain such information will hopefully be more widespread and Dan Savage will pave the way for sex educators alike to share their knowledge with those who know less.

 

 

Works Cited:

Savage, Dan. “Are “Desensitizing Anal Wipes” Dangerous?” Washington City Paper. Web. 19 Apr. 2012.