After glancing back at my findings, I came to several valuable conclusions:

  1. It is important to have talk about sex with your kids, but leave the rest (that you’re uncomfortable discussing, or don’t know much about) for the sex educators at school.
  2. Dan Savage is one of the many helpful sex educators that can be contacted in a time of need. Seek out people who can provide you with resources to make responsible sexual decisions.
  3. Get involved in Sex Week at your school. Help supply condoms, lube and other forms of contraception to students. Advocate for safe sex and encourage others to be responsible as well.
  4. Parents, fight for mandatory sex education in your child’s school. Know what type of sex ed your child will receive (abstinence-only or abstinence based) before piggybacking on concepts that he/she learns in school.
  5. Remember that everyone is unique. Some people identify as a gender that is inconsistent with the sex they were assigned at birth. While this poses conflict with sexual norms in society, it is up to the community to welcome him/her in with open arms, regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity (as seen on Glee).
  6. Be aware of the bills passing in your state. Do you want to live in a state like Tennessee where there is a limit on your exposure to homosexuality? Or do you want your kids to know that their friends are raised by gay parents?
  7.  Use your judgment to monitor or even restrict your child’s exposure to the media, especially the Internet and television/movies.
  8. Do not try to combat your sexual urges by playing soccer.

Homosexuality introduced in schools – To be, or not to be?

In Tennessee, teachers are quieting down during conversations about homosexuality, as the “Don’t Say Gay Bill” cleared the House education committee on Sunday (Hubbard).  What this means is that the Republicans who dominate the Tennessee legislature are taking a very active role in public education and have created a bill that “prohibits the teaching or furnishing of materials on human sexuality other than heterosexuality in public school grades K-8” (Rosenthal). In the event that a teacher or school violates the state’s sex education policy, teachers will face a $50 fine and up to 30 days in jail, according to state law – and this bill passed the Senate last year (Hubbard).

That is appalling.

Whether you want your children exposed to homosexuality at a young age or not is not up to the government. Educators have every right to discuss the different types of family that exist in society today. They have to encourage students to acknowledge and accept reality.

Those who are in denial of such relations and disagree with homosexuality; those people can impose their own beliefs on their children at home, on their own time.

What do you think? Who should impose beliefs on students?  Why can’t educators acknowledge peoples differences? What if one student is raised by a same-sex couple? Can this student not participate in a discussion about family or parental guidance?

 

 

Works Cited:

Hubbard, Julie. “‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill Advances in the House.” The Tennessean. 18 Apr. 2012. Web. 19 Apr. 2012.

Rosenthal, Andrew. “Don’€™t Say €˜Gay. Do Say €˜’Intelligent Design.’™.” The Loyal Opposition. 18 Apr. 2012. Web. 19 Apr. 2012.